Assemblymember Rodriguez Advances Emergency Management Legislative Package Through Critical First Committee

For immediate release:

Assemblymember Rodriguez Advances Emergency Management Legislative Package Through Critical First Committee
 

(Sacramento, CA) Today, Assemblymember Freddie Rodriguez, Chair of the Assembly Emergency Management Committee, advanced his legislative package aimed at improving California’s emergency response systems and programs. AB 1721, AB 1770, and AB 1934 were all passed out of the Assembly Committee on Emergency Management at a hearing in the State Capitol.

“California is a disaster-prone state, and increasing our preparedness before disaster strikes is key to our state’s ability to respond successfully. I am proud to be authoring legislation that will help our first responders stay connected during an emergency, assist aging communities in retrofitting buildings, and freeing up emergency responder resources by easing wall times. Each of these important bills will help ensure Californians remain safe during a disaster or emergency” said Assemblymember Rodriguez.

Assembly Bill 1721 will establish the Emergency Medical Services Mutual Aid Grant Programs, administered by the California Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES). One of these specific programs is the Seismic Retrofitting Program for Soft Story Multifamily Housing Fund. This program would provide owners with financial assistance to do seismic retrofits and mitigate earthquake hazards facing their older, affordable multifamily buildings. These buildings are at high risk of collapse during an earthquake.

Assembly Bill 1770 will require the Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA) to implement policies to reduce ambulance patient offload delays, protecting patients from unnecessary and life-threatening impacts to their overall health outcomes, and preparing for surges in demand.

Assembly Bill 1934 will provide funding for county fairgrounds across California to establish broadband internet connectivity. Fairgrounds are often turned to in disasters to serve as command stations, emergency shelters, and evacuation sites- but not all have adequate internet connections.