Assemblywoman Wendy Carrillo's Statement on Governor Newsom's 2023-2024 Budget Proposal

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SACRAMENTO, CA - Governor Gavin Newsom unveiled his 2023-24 budget proposal on Tuesday, addressing $297 billion in the general fund with a projected $24 billion shortfall signaled by the Legislative Analyst Office. This year’s proposed budget continues to prioritize investments in education, healthcare, the homelessness crisis, housing affordability, climate change, and economic and workforce development. 

Assemblywoman Carrillo (D- Los Angeles) issued the following statement in her role as Chair of Assembly Budget Sub 4, State Administration: 

“The legislature has been diligent in preparing for a budget shortfall with smart, strategic and economically sound investments and savings to the general and rainy day fund. The Governor’s proposed budget touches on key issues and quality of life issues that impact Californias on a day to day basis. In the City of Los Angeles and in the County of Los Angeles, Mayor Karen Bass, and the County Board of Supervisors have declared a state of emergency on homelessness and have made plans to work closely together to address this growing concern. The State of California has invested over $25 billion on this issue since 2018, those funds are transferred to the city and the country, respectfully. While there have been advancements, we want to see increased positive results in ensuring unhoused individuals are placed in permanent supportive housing and for those that need it, receive the necessary life saving mental health and substance abuse help.” 

“Additionally, the Governor’s proposed budget protects classroom funding, increases per-pupil spending and directs funding specifically on learning loss, while also addressing the growing fentanyl-abuse in public schools. The budget reaffirms our $48 billion multi-year commitment to our world-leading goal of achieving carbon neutrality, preserves our pledge to deliver 90% clean energy by 2035 and creates necessary apprenticeship, training and employment programs that align with our clean energy transition goals. The proposed keeps its promise to extend universal healthcare to undocumented Californians while prioritizing the future of CARE Court. On the creative front in a world leading industry, the Governor proposed extending funding to the California Film & Television Tax Credit, which bolsters our state’s economy and supports the jobs and livelihoods of many AD 52  residents. To that end, I look forward to ensuring that diversity and equity are at the forefront of all discussions and I look forward to  working with the Governor and my colleagues in the legislature to iron out the details and deliver a budget worthy of our values by our June deadline.” 

Below is a summary of some key investments proposed by Governor Newsom in his 2023-24 budget proposal: 

Education

  • Invests $23,723 per student – the highest state per-pupil spending in our history
  • Funds universal transitional kindergarten, serving 450,000 children per year. 
  • Directs funds to ensure free meals for every student, regardless of income.
  • Invest over $2 billion annually to expand subsidized child care slot availability 
  • Advances programs like College Corps, Cal Grant, Middle Class Scholarships, and college savings accounts to cut costs of higher education.
  • Continue historic reinvestment into public universities through the higher education systems – increasing seats, closing equity gaps, creating debt-free pathways, and improving job pipelines. 

Housing

  • Invests $15.3 billion to address homelessness – more than ever before in state history
  • Expands homekey, encampment resolution grants and Project Roomkey.
  • Increases the housing supply, dedicating state resources to enforce state housing law. 
  • Holds local governments accountable, ensuring cities plan for their fair share of housing.
  • Improves state financing programs, targeting housing investments, providing technical assistance to rural, tribal, and urban areas, eliminating burdensome regulations, and leveraging land use tools. 

Climate Justice

  • Advances a $48 billion multi-year commitment to a world-leading carbon neutrality goal.
  • Protects communities from harmful oil drilling.
  • Reaffirms commitment to deliver 90% clean energy by 2035.
  • Accelerates the transition to clean energy, investing tens of billions to get more. Californians into zero-emission vehicles and cut the effects of pollution. 
  • Invests in programs to protect Californians from extreme weather conditions, addressing the effects of wildfires, drought, extreme heat, flooding, and mudslides.

Workforce Development 

  • The Governor’s budget invests $1.65 billion to create new apprenticeships, bolster training opportunities for jobs that are leading the clean energy transition.
  • Brings increased attention and resources towards bolstering workforce development efforts for the justice-involved population.
  • Creates new opportunities for a diverse health and human services workforce.
  • Commits $15 million General Fund ongoing at the Department of Industrial Relations to promote and support women and non-binary individuals in skilled trade careers. 
  • Provides an additional $11.7 million in special funds and 42 positions in 2023-24 and $6.5 million special funds ongoing for the Department of Industrial Relations to help address wage claim processing times by improving the efficiency of the claims intake and processing as well as automate portions of the claims processing activities within the Wage Claim Adjudication Unit.

The full budget summary is available at ebudget.ca.gov.

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Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo was elected to the California State Assembly in December of 2017. She  has served  as the Chair of Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration, and as a member of the Assembly Committees on Appropriations, Budget, Health, Housing and Community Development, and Utilities and Energy.